Plant Catalog for Mail Order: Fall 2020

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Mahonia eurybracteata 'Cistus Silvers'
Fireworks for the shade! We've been playing around for some time selecting these platinum babies (now seen as M. eurybracteata). To 5' with few branches and rosettes of 2-3' leaves emerging bronze (lots of precious metals here). Easy for dappled shade to full sun in cooler climates, fall and winter flowers of bright yellow blushed.. um.. copper. Occasional summer watering, excellent focal point, USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $18 2D

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Mahonia fortunei chinese mahonia
This Chinese mahonia is elegant in its simplicity. Unbranched stems rise 3 to 4 feet with fern-like compound leaves, the leaflets narrow and green above, more yellow below. Clusters of lemony yellow flowers appear in late fall followed by purple black berries. Spreads slowly. Thrives in shade or sun, prefering more sun in colder climates, and prone to mildew in Pacific Northwest shade. Supplemental summer water in dry areas. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; root hardy in zone 7 with protection.
Berberidaceae $16 2D

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Mahonia gracilis graceful mahonia
A graceful mahonia that doesn’t look like your average mahonia and can take full sun as well as part shade and even survives harsh, dry conditions! An evergreen shrub, to 6-8 ft tall nearly as wide, with red stems bearing smooth, soft leaves that emerge glossy green, lighter in sun and darker in shade. Long, lax spikes of yellow flowers appear in late autumn and winter. This handsome, Mexican native is best in well-drained soil, in half sun to part shade with at least occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $14 4in

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Mahonia leschenaultii

Berberidaceae $14 2D

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Mahonia sheridaniana 'Roy Lancaster'

Berberidaceae $14 2D

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Mammillaria gracilis thimble cactus
One of Sean’s childhood plants, this is a clustering, small cactus from central Mexico that eventually produces 8” mounds covered with crystalline white spines and, in summer, pinkish flowers. Any brightly lit situation is fine, especially those that dry out a bit in winter. A good small rock garden plant where temperatures remain above 20F, USDA zone 9.
Cactaceae $012 4in

Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'

Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'
Possibly a hybrid between Manfreda jaliscana and Agave scabra, this nearly 2 ft plant, from the semi-desert canyons just over the mountains from Monterey, Mexico, boasts deep purple leaves with, indeed, coffee-colored polka dots over the entire plant. For sun, good drainage, and average summer water. Evergreen to 20F and root hardy into the low teens, USDA zone 8.
Amaryllidaceae $14 4in

Manfreda undulata 'Chocolate Chip'

Manfreda undulata 'Chocolate Chip'
Brand new and rare cultivar with striking leaves, long and narrow with wavy edges and very densely spotted with ... well, chocolate chips. This form of a Mexican native, selected by Yucca Do Nursery, is small, to 4" tall x 15" wide with leaves about 12" long, and offsets very slowly. Flower spikes can reach up to 3' or more! Prefers good drainage, protection from the afternoon sun in the hottest places, and occasional summer water. Root hardy in USDA zone 8.
Agavaceae $014 4D

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Melianthus villosus

Melianthaceae $12 2D

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Metapanax davidii yi ye liang wang cha
A flamboyant small evergreen tree for the garden. The exotic texture is met with the added bonus of great frost hardiness. A large shrub to a miniature, umbrella shaped tree, to about 8-10 ft or so, providing a very tropical effect with evergreen leaves divided into 2s and 3s. These are enhanced by lime-green bark and sputnik-like, araliad flowers followed by blackish blue berries. Shade to dappled sun; full sun in cool areas. Even summer moisture and out of wind in coldest zones. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7. Unusual and beautiful.
Araliaceae $012 3D

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Microsorum fortunei

Polypodiaceae $14 4D

Mimulus cardinalis

Mimulus cardinalisScarlet Monkeyflower
This herbaceous perennial west coast native features downy, semi-sticky, pale green obovate leaves on branching stems to 3' tall and wide. Bearing bright red 1-2" long tubular flowers, this scarlet monkeyflower attracts hummingbirds and other pollinators with its blooms, from early summer through frost. These spread by rhizomes, though also may self sow a bit in optimal conditions, prefering part shade to sun, with rich, moist to wet soil, even standing water for periods, and do not appreciate drying out. USDA zone 7.
Scrophulariaceae $12 4in

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Monardella obispoensis

Lamiaceae $12 2D

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monardella sp. SBH 12298

Lamiaceae $12 3D

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'coyote mint
Native to California, this form was selected by California Flora Nursery from plants found along the Russian River. A tough and vigorous, shrubby perennial, these grow to 1-2 ft tall in clumps to 2 ft wide, with rounded, minty, gray-green leaves on brittle stems. Spring to summer flowers are fragrant, lavendar-pink magnets for hummingbirds and bees. Full sun and well-drained soil are best where summer water is not provided. Said to be deer resistant AND makes a fine tea. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Monardella villosa var. obispoensis San Luis Obispo Coyote Mint
Fuzzy, compact, evergreen perennial with round, gray-green leaves and large, intensely fragrant, lavender flowers relished by butterflies and the occasional hummingbird in spring and summer. Height and width to 18". Shape is largely upright. Excellent plant in heavy, clay soils where drainage is poor. Best in full sun with occasional watering. Excellent in coastal areas. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $9 3D

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Muehlenbeckia axillaris
Often referred to as wire grass, this particularly useful, New Zealand ground cover or container plant grows to only 6" in height, spreading slowly. Dark, wiry stems with shiny, evergreen leaves. Sun to part shade in almost any soil but needing some summer water where particularly dry. Very good around steps or larger specimens such as New Zealand flax. Frost hardy to 8F, upper edge of USDA zone 7.
Polygonaceae $9

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Muehlenbeckia axillaris SBH ? - Steve Newell
low creeping evergreen groundcover
Polygonaceae $9 2D

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Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Nana'
Sweet, evergreen goundcover with tiny, shiny leaves, bonze-tinted when new. 2” tall but spreading into dense patches in full sun or light shade (less dense, perhaps) with regular water. Hardy to 5F and happy along paths or as a filler. USDA Zone 7b.
Polygonaceae $9 4in

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Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Texture Big Leaf'
A straightforward cultivar name for a robust form, shared by Texture Plants of Christchurch, New Zealand, collected quite probably from Three Kings Island. The large leaves, on the same dark stems as others in the genus, can exceed 1" in diameter. Forms a vigorous vine, to 10 ft or more, or a formidable ground cover / spiller. Can root along the stems and could be a bit energetic for the small garden. It can definitely be useful in urban spaces, or where good coverage is wanted in sun to part shade. Spreads slowly or not at all away from summer water, a good control in the American west. Though its origins suggest tenderness, all indications suggest frost hardiness to the single digits F, USDA zone 7b. Wonderful hanging basket or container filler.
Polygonaceae $9 3D

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'tricolor wire grass
A variegated version of the useful, ground-covering wire grass, the leaves splashed with green, white, and pink on dark, wiry stems to only 6" in height, spreading slowly. Evergreen, forming dense mats in sun to part shade in almost any soil but needing some summer water where particularly dry. Very good around steps or larger specimens such as New Zealand flax. Also successful in containers. Frost hardy to 8F, upper edge of USDA zone 7. Sometimes sold as M. axillaris.
Polygonaceae $11 2D

Mukdenia rossii

Mukdenia rossii
Ground-covering perennial, a Heuchera relative from China discovered by the late plantsman, Steve Doonan. Slowly clumping, to 1 ft x 1 ft, in well-drained soil with generous water until established. Quite drought tolerant thereafer. Leaves are a bright, shiny green and the white spring flowers make a nice contrast. Sun to part shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Saxifragaceae $9 4D

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Musa basjoo hardy fiber banana
One of the boldest plants we sell. After 3 years, 20 foot stems with 10 foot long leaves and drooping branches of huge yellow flowers followed by real (insipid) bananas. Full to part sun, serious irrigation and heavy fertilizer. Plant 6" deeper than soil in can. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7a. Wow.
Musaceae $18 4in

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Myrtus communis - upright red
This, a result of our hybridizing over the years, forms a most fragrant shrub to 4-6 ft with red stems and upturned leaves, also tinted red especially in new growth. Charming, white spring flowers lead to blue fruit. Otherwise the same as other Myrtus, loving mineral soil, bright light and tolerating of summer drought. Frost hardy to the bottoms of USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 2D

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Myrtus communis 'Andy Van'
A very hardy garden form of myrtle from Newberg, Oregon. Compact shrub with glossy green leaves and pink tinged white flowers followed by purple berries. Full sun; not much water. Good drought tolerance. Easily frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and has survived into the single digits, zone 7a with some protection.
Myrtaceae $14 3D

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Myrtus communis 'Ann McDonald'
Long having had an interest in this classic, I was delighted to see a large shrub of 8 ft in the wonderful and historic garden of Ann McDonald in Portland, this having been planted some 30 years ago or more and selected for its 1” leaves and large, 1/3” blue-black fruit produced from an exceedingly heavy flowering. Full sun to dappled shade in lean soil with little summer water. This garden provenance has produced a plant able to withstand between 10 to12F – bottom of USDA zone 8 -- with little appreciable damage.
Myrtaceae $14 3D

Myrtus communis 'Variegata'

Myrtus communis 'Variegata'variegated sweet myrtle
Pretty selection of a popular myrtle, the fragrant leaves, glossy green with creamy white margins, creating a lovely background for the abundant, small, white summer flowers -- also fragrant. A medium sized, bushy shrub, reaching 8-10 ft tall and wide, these are easily trimmed or sheared. Useful as a hedge or specimen in the sunny garden. Drought tolerant once established and frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $12 3D

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Myrtus communis ssp. tarentina
Neat, compact shrub with narrow, glossy green leaves, aromatic of course, and pink-tinged, white flowers followed by white berries -- all rather tiny. Flowers are fragrant and attractive to bees. To 3 ft x 3 ft in 10 years. Best in full sun with very little supplemental water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $12 2D

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Myrtus communis ssp. tarentina 'Variegata'
A very hardy form of myrtle. Sturdy and useful compact shrub, evergreen, to 2-3 ft, with narrow, glossy green leaves edged white and pink-tinged white flowers followed by white berries. Best in full sun without too much supplemental water. Leaves are very aromatic and were once considered an aphrodisiac..... Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 3D

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuus

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuushoop petticoat daffodil
Diminutive and tough little daffodil, superbly adapted to dry areas and rock gardens. The 6-12" tufts of chive-like foliage appear in autumn in mild climates with bright yellow, 1" hoops appearing as early as February. In colder climates, foliage appears in February with flowers in early spring. This European native multiplies freely in well-drained soil in sun to a bit of shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae $11 4D

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Narcissus cantabricus var. foliosus Daffodil

$14 3D

Nerine 'After Hours'

Nerine 'After Hours'cape flower, guernsey lily
A lovely amaryllis relative the flowers soft pink with a blue center line and hints of blue throughout, the parents including N. sarniensis, N. bowdenii, and N. pudica. Summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" from September to November; leaves appearing in December and January. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Plant with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, with mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $14 3D

Nerine humilis - deep pink

Nerine humilis - deep pink
Fabulous floriferous bulbs, these amaryllis relatives from South Africa have masses of rather frilly, deep pink flowers, somewhat more finely textured leaves than others. To 12-14" tall. Summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September-November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers, provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection. A fine container plant.
Amaryllidaceae $8 3D

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Nerium oleander 'Cranberry Cooler'

Apocynaceae $14 4D

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Nerium oleander 'Crimea River'
This beautiful plant that might have an old name but lost in translation as it was give to us from a collection in eastern Europe where winter temps have fallen well below 0F. Large shrub to 6 to 8 feet or more with cheery, fragrant double pink flowers over a long season. Excellent for container or warm spot in the garden. As with all members of the milkweed family, leaves are poisonous so... do not eat. USDA zone 7.
Apocynaceae $14 3D

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Neviusia cliftonii Shasta snow-wreath

Rosaceae $14 4D

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Oenothera odorata [from Craig Pruitt's garden]

Onagraceae $9 4in

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Olea europaea 'Ascolana Dura'
A top contender for commercial fruit production in cooler coastal climates and the Willamette Valley. Ornamental too. 20 ft+ Weeping branches, strap-shaped leaves with a dusty yellow reverse, and attractive early fruit. Water to establish; withhold in late summer to harden. Sun in fertile soil. USDA zone 8; quite probably 7.
Oleaceae $18 3D

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Olea europaea 'Fruitless Endeavor' fruitless olive
Small olive tree, to only 4-6 ft tall in five years with a rounded form, a size suitable to the small, sunny and dry garden or as a low, evergreen hedge. This was given to us as cuttings from a many-year-old seedling with long, blue-green weeping foliage.Easily trimmed to shape. Grown only for their ornamental value, they do best in full sun and well-drained soil with very little summer water once established. Can also be grown indoors in a sunny location in a pot that drains well with regular water in summer water (allowing for a bit of drying out) and less frequent water in winter. Frost hardy in the ground to 10F, USDA zone 8. Though shared with us and propagated under the name O. europaea 'Fruitless Dwarf', we have given it what we hope is a more interesting moniker.
Oleaceae $14 3D

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Olea europaea 'Skylark Dwarf'
This selection seems to top out at about 6-8 ft. Few fruits since it is self sterile and has somewhat (how do I say this?) distorted anthers. Shrubby and ornamental. Full sun in lean, well-drained soil. Water to establish but withhold in late summer to harden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Oleaceae $14 2D

Olearia - white form

Olearia - white formdaisy bush
This is a serious "double-take" plant, an evergreen shrub with silver foliage that is completely covered with white daisy flowers in late spring. To 4 ft tall at maturity with stiff, upright stems and a compact form, these are tough and easy in the garden, tolerating drought and coastal conditions. Best in hot sun with little supplemental water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Asteraceae $14 2D

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Olearia fimbriata

Asteraceae $15 2D

Olearia macrodonta var. minor

Olearia macrodonta var. minornew zealand holly
A shrubby daisy-on-a-stick from New Zealand, this one smaller than the species, reaching only 3 ft tall and as wide with soft green, crinkle-textured leaves and corymbs of white flowers in the summer. Like the species, aging bark peels in graceful strips. Full sun is best with well-drained soil and average summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $12 3D

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Olearia oleifolia 'Waikariensis'
Our cuttings from the New Zealand garden at U of Washington Arboretum. Hardy daisy-on-a-stick to 3 ft tall with gold-infused olive-like leaves. White flowers in summer. Excellent foliage foil. Sun to part shade, regular water and fast good drainage. USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $15 3D

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Olearia x haastii daisy bush
This stiff leaved New Zealand ‘daisy on a stick’ is a handsome addition to your sunny border. A shrub to 4 ft tall x 4 ft wide, easily pruned, with fragrant, long-lasting, white flowers in summer and excellent evergreen leaves. Tolerates coastal conditions and summer drought, though accepts regular water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $16 3D

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Ophiopogon 'Golden Zebra'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'snake beard
Cheerful, evergreen mondo grass with tallish, grassy leaves, to 8" tall or so, green with fine white stripes. Summer flowers are white, echoing the variegation, and followed by blue berries. Spreads slowly by underground rhizomes, making small, bright clumps in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $14 4D

Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens'

Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens'black mondo grass
In the garden, purple and black have become the new beige, dark colors being the perfect contrast and background for just about anything. This small lily relative grows only to about 6" in height, spreading contentedly if given plenty of moisture. The black, evergreen leaves and small lilac flowers make any brightly colored object stand out and look wonderful with your new Goth look -- white powdered makeup not included. Full sun to deep shade; a bit slow growing either way. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4D

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Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Way Good Variegated'
A Cistus Introduction. Ultra fine selection of mondo grass with olive green leaves evenly pinstriped a creamy white. Vigorous, spreading at least as fast as more common versions in damp soil. Fine in nearly full sun to fairly dense shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
$14 3D

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Ophiopogon sp. [Preston from UW]

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4in

Opuntia 'Candelaria Flame'

Opuntia 'Candelaria Flame'
A Cistus introduction, from a most variable population in south central Nevada, where these shaggy creatures can vary from gold to white to silver to red. Named for both the nearby small town and the color of its sign, this form of Opuntia erinacea var. ursina 'Candelaria' stood out after an October rain with its brilliant auburn spines, exquisitely back-lit in the autumn sun. Slow to reproduce, adding only a pad or two at a time. These enjoy sharp drainage in full sun avoiding overly saturated winter soil. A very long lasting pot specimen. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5.
Cactaceae $16 3D

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Opuntia 'Golden Globe' prickly pear
A Cistus introduction. From one of our favorite cactus habitats not far north of the aptly named Cactus Mountain Oregon, we believe actually named for particularly large specimens of pediocactus growing on its flanks. This selection from an obviously hybrid colony (parents = Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana) has shaggy upright pads to about 5" creating clumps 8-10" high by 3-4 ft wide with densely petalled flowers of undulating gold yellow, the orange stamens combining to create quite a show. Careful drainage is a must with these cliff dwellers and full sun. More summer drought tolerant than other prickly pears. Probably frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia 'Peach Chiffon' prickly pear
A wonderful new strain of prickly pear with a profusion of silky, peach colored flowers in June on very compact plants, to under 6" tall forming clumps to 30” wide. n extremely prickly creature for full sun to light shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant but happily accepts occasional water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 3D

Opuntia 'Sunset'

Opuntia 'Sunset'
A most attractive variegated prickly pear with but few spines and striking green, cream, and yellow stripes on each pad. The plant often tinted orange in sun or with winter frost. To about 3 x 3 feet in as many years. The mexican origin dictates hardiness only to the bottom of zone 9, possibly 8 if super duper dry. Excellent container plant and not particularly water sensitive.
Cactaceae $16 3D

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Opuntia basilaris 'Isabella Blue'
A Cistus Introduction: This particularly attractive beavertail with a very light golden pattern of glochids and powdery blue stems comes from a unique spot near Lake Isabella growing among oaks and pines in more typical California oak woodland (rather than in the Mojave Desert). That makes this plant capable of withstanding long periods of summer drought AND a good winter soaking. Strawberry colored flowers in mid spring. To 12-18" in height and 2-3 feet wide (wider if kicked around by cattle as in its native habitat). Careful drainage, bright light. Zone 5.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris var. aurea 'Red Rocks'

Cactaceae $15 3D

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Mormon Rock'

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Mormon Rock'
A Cistus introduction from the vicinity of Mormon Rock in southern California. This tightly clumping small form of beavertail has conical blue pads somewhat more flattened than the typical subspecies indicating a possible hybrid. Whatever the botanical case, each pad is only about 3" wide with well-spaced, bright orange glochids giving the whole plant a very cheery appearance. Nice medium-to-cherry-pink flowers appears in mid spring. Not minding extra winter moisture, these are a bit easier to grow than other beavertails, enjoying full sun. Excellent pot or rock garden plant and frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5, probably zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 2D

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Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Wrightwood'
From a most interesting valley in the eastern San Bernardino mountains of SoCal, this miniature beavertail grows to only about 6" in height by 12" in width. The blue-green stems polka dotted with orange glochids (don't touch), and magenta flowers mid spring. Excellent in containers or a very well drained garden situation. Full sun USDA Zone 5.
Cactaceae $12 4in

Opuntia cacanapa 'Ellisiana'tigertongue, spineless prickly pear
Hurray for this nearly spineless, not-to-prickly, prickly pear with blue-green pads, to 6" in diameter, in clumps to as much as 3 ft tall x 4 ft wide. Late spring flowers are bright yellow. Of probable Mexican origin, found in cultivation in Alpine Texas, these are beautiful, architectural, fast-growing and safe to have around curious children. Loves summer water but can fare well without. Frost hardy into the bottom of USDA zone 7. A plant with many synonyms including O. lindheimeri var. ellisiana and O. cacanapa 'Ellisiana'.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia erinacea v. ursina 'White Lightning'
This from an interesting colony of alluvial fans west of Hawthorne NV, where these shaggy plants illuminate for miles when backlit. This all white spined creature grows to about 18" in height to about 2' in width and adorns itself with light yellow flowers in late Spring. Excellent pot plant or outdoors in very well drained soil and a little artificial lightning storm or two, if not naturally occurring. Full sun for best spines. USDA Zone 5 if not colder.
Cactaceae $14 4in

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Opuntia erinacea x 'Pink n' White' - Emory County, UT [TH]
USDA Zone 4, pink flowers
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washington

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washingtonbrittle pricklypear
From a collection by Ian Barclay near his wonderful nursery in Sequim Washington, this rainshadow population growing on rocks near the Puget Sound might not be the most beautiful form in the world but it certainly is interesting! A rather sparsely spined creature, forming open clumps with occasional light yellow flowers. It is always a surprise to come across a prickly pear west of the Cascades Mountains and these have surprised many a beachcomber taking a break on nearby rocks. Sun for sure. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Alberta Sunset'
A Claude Barr introduction many years ago, this diminutive plant from the northern Great Plains grows only to 4-5" to height forming colonies of dense clumps to 18" in diameter over time. With nearly spineless pads and colors beginning warm yellow and aging through colors of the sunset. Fantastic for the rock garden or a small container. Zone 3
Cactaceae $11 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Neon Gold'
A Cistus introduction. Our southern Utah collection of this probable hybrid with fragilis, golden spines, and clumping 4 to 6" in height by 2' across in a couple of years. The most striking feature ,brightly salmon to coral colored pads as they emerge in the spring. Excellent container plant, or rock garden subject, for bright light, well drained soil. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Red N Black'
Very nice version of our native Opuntia, this with striking red and black spines growing to 4-6" tall by 3 ft wide and showing off yellow flowers in late spring. Handsome in the sunny well-drained garden, with occasional, monsoon-like summer water for best appearance. Frost hardy in USDA zone 3.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) 'Nearly Famous'
Our collection form SE Utah, this doubtless a love child with O. polyacantha grows to about 6" in height by 3ft. Densly held grey-green pads of only a couple of inches, slightly flattened with short spines a pleasing light straw color. light pink flowers in some abundance mid spring. Full sun with occasional summer water and sharp drainage, easy in rock garden or trough. USDA zone 4 if not colder.
Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'potato cactus
This variety of the fragile prickly pear from the western Colorado plateau tends to be almost entirely nekkid, not even having the tiny glochids we've come to enjoy. A favorite of rock and trough gardeners, these have round pads, to under 2", that clump to at least 3 ft wide but only a few inches in height, turning purplish in winter and producing occasional lemon-yellow flowers in mid spring. This clone shared with us by Western Colorado's Don Campbell. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4, possibly lower.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia fragilis th.073 [Salinas Creek] brittle prickly pear
Another find from southern Utah by plantsman Tim Hanis, these small, round, padded clumps, to 4-5" tall and 18" wide, are adorned with cream and white spines and gold glochids. Occasional yellow flowers appear in mid spring. Cute little pot, container, or rock garden creature for full sun. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, possibly colder.
Cactaceae $11 4D

Opuntia fragilis x 'Duchesne Red'
This probable hybrid from the county of the same name, has chubby little pads about 1 by 2", forming 8 to 10" compact clusters with gray and black spines, prominant red glouchids and light yellow flowers. Easy to grow if given bright light and summer moisture along with well drained soil, excellent in containers. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 4in

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Opuntia fragilis x erinacea 'San Juan Grey'
A Cistus Introduction. From a diverse hybrid cluster southeast of Moab UT comes this 6" by 18" mound former, distinctly greenish grey pads adorned with short black and grey spines, warm yellow flowers mid spring. Happy in any well drained soil, including rock garden or container if provided full sun. USDA zone 3.
$14 3D

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Opuntia imbricata - Tim's purple
Though it may never make anyone's list of street trees, this mighty little cholla collected by Tim Hannis, can eventually reach 4-6 ft tall, rounded stem segments, or joints, to 14" long, with numerous pink-red spines. Striking purple flowers appear in late spring to early summer followed by spineless yellow fruit that is edible. These natives of semi-arid areas of the southwest prefer full sun, good drainage, and only occasional summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia imbricata 'Guadalupe'

Opuntia imbricata 'Guadalupe'chain cholla
A Cistus introduction, our collection from the Guadalupe Mountains, skirting the Texas-New Mexico boarder at about 6500 ft. This a particularly rounded, small tree, to about 6 ft tall, with bright green stems and plum colored flowered, abundant in June and producing yellow fruit. Easy and tolerant of many conditions provided decent drainage. Frost hardy to at least -10F, USDA zone 6, probably zone 5.
Cactaceae $14 3D

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Opuntia microdasys - dwarf red

Cactaceae $12 2D

Opuntia microdasys - Monstrose form

Opuntia microdasys - Monstrose formbunny ears cactus
This form of the bunnie ears opuntia has been in cultivation for a long time but has never become common. Looks like something from the Flintstones; each lumpy pad is covered with golden spots of tiny glochids, the plant occasionally to about 18” and flowering in golden yellow. Best in well-drained soil where it is dryish outside. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8. Otherwise an excellent container plant.
Cactaceae $15 4in

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'
Given to us long ago and found in an old Albuquerque garden in a rather chilly climate where the species often comes to winter...These bunny's ears grow to about 18" tall and spreading to 3' or more over time. The polka dot yellow pattern of the glochids is attractive... Beware though - their soft appearance is misleading as those glochids can be annoying if brushed. Small yellow flowers in mid spring. Zone 7 with good drainage. A good container specimen.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia phaeacantha 'Little Millard'
A Cistus introduction. One of the best opuntias for fruit, shared with us by keen-eyed plantsman Tim Hanis. This low grower, to only about 12-18" but spreading to 4-5' has bluish pads, rusty spines, yellow flowers with a hint of orange, and abundant dark red fruit from mid-summer through autumn. Beautiful in the garden, even if you don't make jelly. Full sun, reasonably well-drained soil, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 3D

Opuntia polyacantha 'Crystal Tide'

Opuntia polyacantha 'Crystal Tide'
This Claude Barr introduction forms dense clumps to 18" tall and spreading to 3 feet. The olive green pads are covered with golden and white spines. Silver pink flowers occur in mid spring. Very good container or landscape plant for well-drained soil and bright light. To zone 3.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana SBH 7524
A Cistus introduction. Our selection/collection from NE Oregon's Imnaha Canyon growing to 18" in height by 3' in width in a short amount of time, with gray green pads adorned with twisted gold and white spines giving it an interestingly shaggy appearance. The semi double 3 to 4" flowers open a warm apricot to yellow, fading on the 2nd day, and centered with bright red stamens. Give excellent drainage, bright light, in container or in the ground, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4in

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Opuntia polycantha x 'Grey Ghost'
A Cistus introduction, this from the lower reaches of Northeastern Oregon Imnaha Canyon where several opuntia species merge. To 18" by 3' clumps of blue-grey pads adorned with white spines and warm yellow flowers in mid Spring. Excellent in containers or rock gardens especially where spines can be backlit. Full sun, sharp drainage, USDA Zone 5 if not lower.
$15 4in

Opuntia potsii var. montana

Opuntia potsii var. montana
A wonderful little cactus from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to only 4" tall x 30" wide, with green pads and very short spines. Summer flowers are lemon yellow, single and simple. Best in lean soil, good drainage, and bright light, though these are more shade tolerant than most opuntias. Needs little to no summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined form

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined formcockspur prickly pear
Diminutive, mat-forming prickly pear from the Gulf Coast to the lower Carolinas, found most often in coastal sand dunes with 2" flattened pads, yellow flowers, and, in this form, golden spines, making a most attractive, fast-growing garden or container plant. Pads easily detach and can be shared purposely or not. Frost hardy in low USDA zone 7, possibly zone 6. Quite moisture tolerant as well.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Sara's Robust'
This pretty selection found by Desert Way nursery near phoenix, grows 18" to 2' by about the same, with multiple branches, pink tinted in winter and tipped with a halo of golden spines. This little cholla prefers excellent drainage and bright light, very sculptural container plant as well. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $9 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Semi Freddie' pencil cholla, diamond cholla
A Cistus introduction. This from an area straddling the Arizona/Nevada border, where the forms tend to make 3 to 4' wide, fairly dense clumps of about 18" in height, looking of under sea creatures with but a few small spines atop rose tinted stems. These plants have been subject to much less passive recreation and botanizing, and have been run over a number of times by off-road vehicles......too bad the spines aren't sharper. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Oryzopsis hymenoides indian rice grass

Poaceae $12 4in

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Rotundifolius'

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Rotundifolius'
Slow growing and quite showy evergreen shrub with rounded, shiny, dark green foliage -- a very unlikely sweet olive. White flowers in winter, small but intensely fragrant. Reaches 5 x 5 ft or so at maturity in sun to part shade where the soil is rich and receives regular summer water. Can be used for a low hedge. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Oleaceae $16 4in

Oxalis oregana - Rowdy Creek

Oxalis oregana - Rowdy Creekredwood sorrel
A Cistus introduction, collected near Rowdy Creek on the Smith River almost directly on the California/Oregon border. This form of the native redwood sorrel grows to 6-8" in height, the leaves dark green above with deep maroon undersides and the flowers, smallish and pale pink in spring and summer. Works well in the deepest dark, dry shade, or in dappled sun. Happy to go dormant in the summer but remains evergreen with some water. Grows vigorously in winter. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7. An excellent small-scale groundcover.
Oxalidaceae $11 4D

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Oxalis triangularis 'Purpurea' purple shamrock
Sweet perennial, to only 10" tall and spreading, with dark, dark maroon leaves, indeed triangular, topped with small pink flowers in spring. Dappled shade to part shade with average summer moisture in rich soil. Goes dormant without water or in a cold winter. Bulbs are frost hardy to USDA zone 6.
Oxalidaceae $7 4in

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Pachystegia minor

$14 2D

Parahebe catarractae - blue form

Parahebe catarractae - blue form
Versatile hebe relative, a shrubby, multi-stemmed, perennial with medium green foliage and purple-blue flowers in late summer. Can be sheared after blooming to lengthen bloom time. Usually remains under 3 ft tall. Sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established but accepts summer water. Useful as a groundcover in dry places, a low border, or in containers. Evergreen in USDA zone 9 and frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Plantaginaceae $9 2D

Parahebe perfoliata

Parahebe perfoliata
Light purple pendant bells all summer carried above handsome grey-green foliage. Tough and dependable in the perennial border or draping over a wall. Sun to part shade, regular water.
Plantaginaceae $12 4in

Paris polyphylla - Heronswood form

Paris polyphylla - Heronswood formmulti-leaf paris
A fabulous plant for the shade garden, a Nepalese trillium relation collected by intrepid plantsman, Dan Hinkley. These have surprising flowers, green sepals in a star shape and thready golden petals, followed by late summer fruit in shades of red-orange. The whorled leaves are handsome and provide a nice statement. To see it is to covet it. For shade and rich soil with summer moisture. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Melanthiaceae $22 4D

Pelargonium sidoides

Pelargonium sidoides
We wouldn’t care if this small evergreen pelargonium never bloomed, but gosh darn it, its dark maroon/black flowers are fabulous. Silver, velvety foliage is scented to touch. Compact, to about 1' tall and wide. Sun or shade. Occasional summer water. Excellent in pots. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.
Geraniaceae $14 2D

Persicaria 'Brushstrokes'

Persicaria 'Brushstrokes'brushstrokes fleece flower
New and handsome persicaria, more upright than some, to 2 ft tall in sun and 3 ft in shade, with striking, velvety green leaves, and, in late fall, spikes of tiny red flowers, late enough to minimize reseeding. Perennial, dying back each winter. Enjoys average soil in sun to part shade with some summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. Said to be deer resistant.
Polygonaceae $9 3D

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Persicaria microcephala 'Red Dragon' PP 12062 red dragon fleece flower
Colorful perennial with burgundy stems adorned with purple leaves marked with darker chevrons. To 3-4 ft tall x 4-5 ft wide, these are great fillers in the garden or in containers especially in late summer into fall when tiny white flowers dress the stem tips. Well-behaved, these don't spread by runners but may root at tips that touch the ground. Otherwise, rich soil and regular summer water. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Polygonaceae $14 4D

Philadelphus 'Innocence'

Philadelphus 'Innocence'mock orange
A most lovely form of the old-fashioned mock orange with particularly striking variegated leaves on this 6-8 ft, arching, deciduous shrub. Shared with us by our friend, Deborah Chaffee, the flowers are particularly fragrant, noticeable at a great distance from spring through early summer and occasionally thereafter -- with regular watering. Drought tolerant once established; sun to dappled shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Hydrangeaceae $014 3D

Philadelphus mexicanus 'Rosemary Brown'

Philadelphus mexicanus 'Rosemary Brown'
A Cistus introduction from a wild collection in the highlands of northeastern Mexico. Evergreen, silvery arching shrub to 4 ft weighted down with squared, pure white, intensely fragrant flowers displayed upright & overlapping. Very desirable. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Hydrangeaceae $14 3D

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Philadelphus microphyllus
A favorite western native species and underused. Diminutive shrub, 3 to 5 ft with great age. Tiny leaves, under 1/3" on wiry, blackened stems, and little clusters of 1/2" fragrant, white flowers. Exceedingly drought tolerant. Full sun to dappled shade, good drainage, adaptable to summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5 or possibly lower.
Hydrangeaceae $14 2D

Philadelphus microphyllus 'Desert Snow'
This diminutive, western native was selected by Nevin Smith from seed collected desert traveller Sally Walker. and shared with us by Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens, one of the best native gardens anywhere. This small shrub -- to about 4', maybe a little taller. though as RSABG they have remained under 2' -- has 1", pointed leaves with darkened stems and 1" clusters of very fragrant, densely held, white flowers, larger than the typical species, from mid spring to early summer. Tolerant of great drought but responds to garden water. A plant that should be much used in dry areas of the West. Full to part sun. USDA zone 6, maybe even 5.
Hydrangeaceae $15 2D

Phlebodium pseudoaureum

Phlebodium pseudoaureumblue rabbit's foot fern
Once part of a more familiar genus and known as Polypodium areolatum, these ferns are handsome by any name with their evergreen, glaucous gray-blue, deeply lobed fronds to only 12" tall emerging from fuzzy red rhizomes that lie close to the surface. Wonderful in the garden in well-drained, consistently moist soil in part sun to dappled shade. Striking as cut foliage. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $16 4in

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Phlomis 'Sunningdale Gold' jerusalem sage
Always interested in fuzzy plants, we are captivated by the warm, golden indumentum that covers leaf and stem of this evergreen shrublet. Shared with us by British plantsman John Grimshaw, it is our new favorite phlomis. Early summer brings cheerful yellow and fuzzy flowers that lead to fuzzy seed capsules in summer and autumn. To about 3 ft tall with a broad pyramidal growth habit. Perfect for the Mediterranean border in any spot with sun, well-drained soil and limited summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

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Phlomis anatolica 'Lloyd's Variety' Jerusalem Sage
Rugged and useful shrubby perennial with fuzzy stems and on velvety light green, almost gray, leaves. Evergreen. Blooms on this selection are brighter, a flag-yellow, and lightly fragrant reminiscent of cloves. Indeed, all of the Jerusalem sages are proven in dry, sunny spaces and on hot, exposed slopes where other plants suffer from winds and drought. Height 3-4' and width often more (give them space), creating a soft, mounding appearance. Well-drained soil and light summer watering. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

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Phlomis angustifolia

Lamiaceae $12 4D

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Phlomis fruticosa - compact form
Drought tolerant shrub, with furry, wooly leaves gray-blue on top and lighter and brighter beneath. This form smaller and more compact, to only 2-3 ft tall and wide, but with the same cheerful flowers, whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy blossoms, on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 4in

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Phlomis italica
One of our favorites, mostly because we get to use one of those cool words–flocccose–to describe the yellow thick hairy leaves. 2 foot tall by 4 ft wide or so with woolly lavender pink flowers. From the Balearic Islands. Full sun, not much summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

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Phlomis margaritae

Lamiaceae $12 4in

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Pimelea prostrata new zealand daphne
Spreading, evergreen groundcover, to only a few inches tall and spreading to 2-3 ft wide, slowly forming a mat of tiny, very bright, pale blue leaves with, in summer, clusters of tiny, fragrant, white flowers atop the foliage. A charming plant for spilling over walls or along walkways in full sun to part shade and well-drained soil where roots can be kept cool. Appreciates summer water but tolerates some summer drought once established. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9, in a protected spot, and possibly lower with good drainage.
Thymelaeaceae $11 2D

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Pittosporum divaricatum
This plant, on our lust list for years, is in many ways a typical New Zealand citizen, with tiny, 1/4 inch, narrow, toothed leaves of nearly jet black, providing difficult grazing for beaky animals….all this on a densely upright, divaricating shrub. Eventually to 8 ft or more, but easily kept at 3-4 ft, producing small, dark red flowers and, with age, larger leaves. Striking pot or garden specimen. We suggest planting with silver foliage plants so youngsters don’t get lost or stepped on. Prefers some summer water. Has proven hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

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Pittosporum eugenoides - South Island collection
Our interior South island New Zealand collection, this 15-18' shrub to small tree with an upright habit. Pleasing evergreen leaves mottled somewhat purple especially in the cool season. Extends the usefulness as hedge or garden specimen into cooler regions than previously grown. Excellent hedge. Plant where passersby can smell the cinnamon scented flowers in late winter or early spring. Water periodically in summer when dry. Full sun to dappled shade, medium to well drained soil. USDA zone 7b.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum heterophyllum

Pittosporum heterophyllumchinese mock orange
This evergreen "mock orange" should be in every shopping center parking lot– it’s that tough. Sadly, it’s not well represented anywhere. Medium shrub to small tree,12 to 15 ft, with glossy, narrow foliage and, in spring, pale yellow, intoxicatingly scented flowers. Delicious! Sun to part shade with regular water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'variegated chinese mock orange
One of the most frost hardy of the Chinese mock oranges, this form, introduced only a few years ago from Japan, grows to 4 ft or so with 2” leaves margined and streaked most attractively in white and cream. Creamy flowers are scented of orange blossoms in mid spring to early summer. Can be shorn as hedge or used as specimen plants in decently drained soil. Prefers sun to half shade and supplemental summer water where very dry. Easy. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'
Too rare in horiticulture. Selected by Sean Hogan from Taiwanese collections by Dan Hinkley - P. illicioides DJHT 99079, chosen for the extremely narrow leaves that present a fine texture in the garden. A tall, evergreen shrub, to 12-15 ft, with fragrant, white flowers in spring and, in autumn, very small, blue-black fruit in orange capsules. Best in light shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, and expected in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Pittosporum sahnianum

Pittosporum sahnianum
A hardy pittosporum, the hardiest we know, having withstood winter rigors of -8F, lower USDA zone 6, in North Carolina. And it's handsome, too, an evergreen shrub, to 6-8 ft tall x 4-6 ft wide, with fragrant, pale yellow flowers in spring. Although now placed by some within P. illicioides, we know that our plant, from the JC Raulston Arboretum, is smaller with wider leaves. Summer water in full sun to medium dappled shade and well-drained soil. A pittosporum to enjoy with no worries about weather.
Pittosporaceae $16 4in

Pittosporum tenuifolium

Pittosporum tenuifoliumkohuhu, black matipo
Fabulous unnamed selection of this well behaved, evergreen, New Zealand shrub that can reach 15-20 ft tall x 10-15 ft wide in time. Full to half sun with occasional summer water once established. Shiny, medium green leaves with wavy, undulating edges are held on dark, nearly black stems, with tiny, dark purple, sweetly fragrant flowers adding magic in spring. Excellent hedge or small specimen tree. Fine in coastal sun, enjoying a bit of afternoon shade inland with regular summer water for best appearance. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, possibly colder.
Pittosporaceae $12 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'
Of the often jewel-like members of this highly selected species from New Zealand, P.t. 'Argentea Nana' is indeed one of the most exquisite. Young plants form mounds, 18" to 2 ft , of densely held, 1/4" leaves on black stems. As plants emerge into their adult phase, the leaves grow farther apart and the plants become more open. This too is attractive but if one misses the old days, a little shearing can never hurt. On older plants late spring flowers are under 1/3", maroon to nearly black with the fragrance of dianthus. Dappled shade to full sun with regular summer water preferred. Exquisite container plant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'ruffled kohuhu
Small, gray-green, wavy leaves float above black stems on this delicately textured shrub, possibly reaching 12 ft in time. Tiny black flowers appear in spring, stunning against the foliage and highly fragrant as well. Best when backed by darker foliage. Site out of wind and close to a path to be admired. Sun to part sun in hottest climates with some summer water. Frost hardy to at least 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Tandarra Gold'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Tandarra Gold'
A most refined P. tenuifolium, said to be a sport of P. tenuifolium ‘Silver Sheen’ with its ever-so slightly silver tinted leaves. Most importantly though, leaves of under 1/2” carry the same silvery coloring, in this form a yellow blotch takes up nearly the whole leaf, creating a wonderful color contrast with the typical black stems. Without pruning, becomes upright to 8-10 ft or more with an almost cloudlike texture … yellow clouds, of course. Provide summer water and, for the most dainty appearance, keep out of the hottest afternoon sun. Makes a supurb pot plant, alas it is one of the more tender with possible damage in the upper teens F, upper USDA zone 8. Otherwise easy care.
Pittosporaceae $15 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Victoria'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Victoria'victoria kohuhu
Another new Pittosporum for us and, we believe, for the United States as a whole, this one having the reputation of one of the most frost hardy in New Zealand. Compact plants with upright dense form, to 6-8 ft, with 1/4", nearly round leaves, splashed pink and silver -- reminiscent of P. tenuifolium ''Silver Magic' but to our eyes darker in color and more compact. Same culture as for others: well-drained soil, bright light, and even summer moisture. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8; possibly 7 with protection.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'mock orange
The hardiest of P. tobira clones, this selection is from JC Raulston Arboretum has survived temperatures to 0F without blinking. Large, evergreen shrub to small tree, to 8 ft tall x 6 ft wide, has shiny, dark green, rounded leaves and, in early summer, intensely fragrant, citrus-like, white flowers. Appreciates full sun to part shade, with regular summer water until established. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'alpine plum yew
OoooH! We think we are becoming quite enamored with these little podocarps. Another down-under plant selected by famed County Park Nursery in the United Kingdom, this jewel-like little conifer, reaches only about 3 ft with densely held, shiny, rounded needles of deepest green/maroon in summer, taking on fiery purple-orange tints in winter, especially in new growth. A fabulous addition to container or garden. The P. alpinus group is one of the most hardy of the genus, this plant having been hardy to close to 0F in several gardens. Stunning when planted with other party goers such as Uncinia rubra and, maybe our favorite, Libertia peregrinans for a rusty contrast. Average soil conditions; bright light best; not appreciative of prolonged drought. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $16 4D

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Podocarpus chingianus UCSC 95-97
Related to P. chinensis, these rare podocarps grow to an eventual 20 ft tall x 6-8 ft wide. A striking architectural feature for the garden, with "needles" of 1/2" held against the stem giving an almost tufted appearance. Best in full sun or the light understory. Though drought tolerant, growth can be boosted by light summer watering. Frost hardy to 10F or so, USDA zone 8, and possibly lower.
Podocarpaceae $15 2D

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'
Spreading shrub to small tree from New Zealand with foliage that turns a very dark purple in winter, lightening a bit in summer. Has very nice red berries. Can be easily hedged, making it a nice alternative to yew or other more commonly used conifers. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $14 4in

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Podocarpus macrophyllus 'Golden Crown'

Podocarpaceae $16 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis UCSC 75.44

$14 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis x totara UCSC 90.569

Podocarpaceae $14 2D

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Podocarpus parlatorei - cl 1 [Cistus plant] pine of the mountains
A beautiful and surprisingly hardy Andean podocarp shared with us by Woodlanders Nursery, reaching 15-20' in a reasonable time with a fine scaled, somewhat weeping habit in our garden, the foliage a cheerful green against silvery bark. Evergreen and happy in dappled shade to full sun and fairly well-drained soil with summer water in dry climates. Seems fine as low as USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae $18 3D

Podocarpus salignus

Podocarpus salignuswillowleaf podocarp
One of a number of exquisite and rare conifers from southern Chile, this upright, forest dweller with weeping branches and gracefully hanging foliage looks for all the world like the bamboo you always wanted. Particularly beguiling as it grows in several places with the Chilean native Chusquea culeou, a combination we observed during our first collections in Chile some years ago. Nothofagus and luma are other associates in this moist cool maritime environment. Unlike some other rarities, it has become quite at home in cultivation, adding a graceful subtropical effect in our courtyard and having remained undamaged in temperatures in the low teens F in several gardens. A plant for reasonably moist soil and average fertility, bright light to dappled shade (weeps a bit more in dappled shade). Eventually to 25-30 ft, more reasonably to 15 ft in the garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae $16 2D

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Podophyllum delavayi - large leaf
Gorgeous podophyllum, this form of the already interesting P. delavayi is larger in all its parts, particularly in leaf size. Deciduous, in spring, huge leaves unfurl in glossy Carnuba waxed elegance followed by pendant cherry-red flowers and brightly colored fruit. For the shady moist area of your woodland garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Berberidaceae $24 4D

Polygonatum kingianum [red flowered form]
Exquisite, upright or clamoring perennial with narrow leaves and red-tinted flowers to 3' or more, spreading to form small colonies. Flowering throughout late spring and summer. Winter deciduous. Dappled shade to full sun in coastal climates. Rich soil with summer moist conditions, hearkening to its Asian origins. Zone 6.
$16 4D

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Polygonatum odoratum - Suncrest
A pretty and sturdy woodland perennial, unusual for its variegated leaves dark green edged with creamy white. Stems reach 20" tall in patches that can spread to 3 ft wide over time. Spring flowers are particularly charming, white bells hanging down from arching stems. Afternoon shade to full shade is best in rich, moist soil. Leaves turn yellow just before plants go dormant for the winter. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
$15 3D

Polygonatum verticillatum

Polygonatum verticillatumWhorled Solomon's Seal
Very cool Solomon's Seal known for its arching, narrow, whorled leaves and upright, stately architectural appearance, reminiscent of bamboo or equisetum, white-pink, bell-shaped flowers appearing in late spring that dangle handsomely from the leaf axils, followed by clusters of adorable red fruit in fall. Excellent mass planting among hostas or other large-leaved perennials, or next to large boulders, where they are allowed to shoot up to a majestic 6-7' in height. Part sun is ideal with occasional summer watering to keep from drying out completely. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4in

Polypodium scouleri

Polypodium scoulerievergreen licorice fern
Native to the coastal forest along the immediate Pacific Coast, growing on rocks and atop and among the gnarled branches of ancient redwoods. Our only evergreen licorice fern and an attractive plant in the garden -- even without the ancient trees -- to about 12" tall and slowly spreading. Very good for container, rooftop, or evergreen groundcover. Best where soil is rich and well-drained, in shade inland or sun along the immediate coast. Enjoys some summer moisture but dislikes being too wet. Frost hardy to 10F, zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $12 4in

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Poncirus trifoliata trifoliage orange
Bitter orange, very architectural with green stems and wicked thorns. Extremely hardy, deciduous citrus, best in winter when the green stems and thorns are exposed and large orange fruits hang on. In spring, there are white flowers with a sweet fragrance. Plant in containers for more drama; in the ground for easiest care. 10 ft in time... a long time. Extremely frost hardy, to USDA zone 5.
Rutaceae $16 4D

Prostanthera lasianthos

Prostanthera lasianthosvictorian christmas bush
Tall and lush evergreen shrub, the largest of the Australian mint bushes, to 15 ft tall x 7-8 ft wide though easily kept smaller, with dark green, slightly toothed leaves, very minty when brushed or crushed. Lovely fat sprays, of white bell-flowers with purple and orange markings hang from the branches in late spring. Best in full to part sun, protected from winds and difficult winter weather, with regular summer water in driest climates at least until well-established. Frost hardy to the mid teens F, USDA zone 8b.
Lamiaceae $11

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Prostanthera ovalifolia 'Variegata' Variegated mint bush
Aromatic, minty leaves, green with white margins, adorn this erect evergreen shrub from Australia. Grows quickly, to 8-12 ft tall x 6-8 ft wide. Blooms profusely in spring with abundant purple flowers on branched stalks above the foliage. Prefers sun or part shade with average summer water for best performance. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

Prostanthera rotundifolia

Prostanthera rotundifoliaAustralian mint bush
From the wonderful group of Australian, shrubby mints. Brush past this mint bush and you are enveloped in a cloud of cool fragrance. Abundant pale purple flowers in spring and early summer. Shear lightly for repeat bloom. Sun and moist, fertile, well-drained soil. To 4-6 ft tall and nearly as wide. Plant in a protected spot away from harsh elements for winter survival in upper USDA zone 8. Easy in zone 9 and well worth a try below.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

Pseudopanax ferox

Pseudopanax feroxtoothed lancewood
One of those cool dinosaur plants found down Kiwi way that catches the eye and triggers the lust gene in plant geeks and adventurous gardeners. Juvenile leaves are dark brown, long, very narrow, stiff, and saw-toothed, growing downward from a central stem -- odd indeed. Slow growing, trees reach 20 ft in 20+ years, only then producing adult foliage, shorter, wider, and green. Sun to dappled or bright shade and regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8b in a sheltered location, though even in Portland we keep most of ours in containers and shelter during winter cold.
Araliaceae $24 4in

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Punica granatum 'Nana Plena' dwarf pomegranate
Dwarf, double-flowered pomegranate, to only 3 ft tall or so, with leaves smaller than the species and small, but spectacular, double flowers. USDA Zone 8a.
Lythraceae $12 3D

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